Fun Facts About Volcanoes: A Lesson In Geology

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What’s a science class without volcanoes? Volcanoes are fascinating to learn about and help us understand the earth. They have been around forever, and have changed the landscape of our planet in many ways. In this article, we’ll take a look at just some of the fun facts about volcanoes that you might not know.

What are Volcanoes

Volcanoes are mountains of molten rock, known as magma, or lavas, that erupt from beneath the surface of the Earth. They can be found on every continent and on most islands around the world. Some volcanoes are active and some are dormant. What is the difference between a volcano and hydrothermal vents? Volcanoes and hydrothermal vents are both types of hot spots, usually underground, that can produce lava and magma. However, volcanoes are associated with explosive eruptions and hydrothermal vents do not.

What is a caldera? A caldera is an area, usually circular in shape (although there are examples of elliptical calderas), formed by the collapse of a volcanic edifice (volcano). The term is also used to refer to the volcanic edifice itself. Where do volcanoes erupt from? Volcanoes erupt from the Earth’s crust, beneath the surface of the Earth. They can be found on every continent and on most islands around the world. Some volcanoes are active and some are dormant. What is a caldera? A caldera is an area, usually circular in shape (although there are examples of elliptical calderas), formed by the collapse of a volcanic edifice (volcano). The term is also used to refer to the volcanic edifice itself. Where do volcanoes erupt from? Volcanoes erupt from the Earth’s crust, beneath the surface of the Earth. They can be found on every continent and on most islands around the world. Some volcanoes are active and some are dormant.

Types of Volcanoes

Volcanoes are the most explosive, dangerous type of eruption there is. There are different types of volcanoes that range from the very small and modest to the VERY large and intense! They all have unique characteristics, but they all cause similar hazards: too much gas, ash, and rock that can cover a town or city. That’s why it’s important to learn about them because we can predict what will happen with them during eruptions and we can prepare accordingly.

Basic Life Cycle of a Volcano

When a volcano starts, it usually begins with an earthquake. The strength of the earthquake can determine how quickly and how violently the volcano will erupt. After the initial earthquake, magma gushes from the ground when cracks in the earth release pressure build-up and molten rock up to 1 million degrees Fahrenheit. Once this starts, it is not long before there is a volcanic eruption. This eruption comes from both lava and ash that are ejected from the volcano’s mouth.

If a Volcano Goes Violent

If a volcano goes violent, it can cause the worst natural disasters in history. The recent eruption of Mount Sinabung in Indonesia is causing evacuation, and a massive amount of damage to the area. The volcano has been active for several years, but it shows no signs of slowing down at all.

Volcano Map

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How Volcanoes Are Named

Volcanoes are named according to their location and the amount of lava they have erupted. Each volcano has a name that ends in -lahn. For example, Mount Saint Helens in Washington is designated as Mount Saint Helens after the region it is in, but if it were to erupt again, it would be called Mount St. Hellens.

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